Auras an essay on the meaning of colors

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Tara’s quirky PI business is attracting some even quirkier customers. She’s not sure how Madame Vine’s Escort Agency got her number. And then there’s the eccentric motorcycle racing team owner, Bolo Ignatius. Both these clients want to Tara to investigate suspicious circumstances that turn up dead bodies. That can only mean one thing in this town: John Viaspa. Tara goes in for round two with the local crime boss, while balancing the tight rope of her deliciously complicated love life.
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Tara Sharp’s life can only be describe as furious fun.

A remarkable skirmish between the Georgian and the Victorian occurred in the field of architecture. In the early 19th century, the dominant style of architecture was that of the Greek Revival – an attempt at exact reconstruction of the remains described in such works as Stuart and Revett’s The Antiquities of Athens (1762). This solid and urbane style, propagated by Smirke, Nash and Burton, was most effectively employed in the erection of the monumental new parish churches required in areas of population growth. The use of the Grecian architecture in an ecclesiastical context, noted by John Summerson in his amusing comment concerning the tower of St. John’s Waterloo Road (‘the kind of tower Ictinus might have put on the Parthenon if the Athenians had had the advantage of belonging to the Church of England’), aroused the contempt of those who believed this to be ‘Pagan’. Chief among these was Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, the fervent Roman Catholic and designer whose publications ignited what became known as ‘the Battle of the Styles’. During the 18th century, the use of ‘Gothick’ in building had been an occasional curiosity, frivolously employed, as at Horace Walpole’s Strawberry Hill and the garish parish church at Shobdon, Herefordshire. Such structures used medieval motifs without the ‘correct’ reconstruction of gothic form. Now, in Pugin’s eyes, the gothic assumed a sacred significance as the only truly Christian style of architecture, for ‘in it alone we find the faith of Christianity embodied, and its practices illustrated’. In contrast, the classical buildings of Pugin’s own time were ‘the veriest heathen buildings imaginable’.

Richard Spruce, along with his favorite bryological specimens, occupied tenuous, almost dual identities in Victorian science. Both the botanist and his bryological colleagues struggled with how “popular” their work could aspire to be. Although he generally fits into the category of masculine, sensationalist Victorian explorer (along with Wallace and Bates), Spruce was far from the strong, resilient model of conqueror of nature; for most of his life, the naturalist was too sick to work, and spent his favorite days in the Amazon sitting quietly on the ground, examining the miniscule plants that reminded him of home. These miniscule plants, too, fit uneasily into broader botanical categories. While they represented something clandestine, sexual, and primeval in literature, bryophytes were considered relatively uninteresting and even unimportant in a rapidly expanding British botanical empire. Although he never fully transformed into a species of moss, Richard Spruce’s uncommon affinity with the plants relegated his work to the depths of the botanically obscure, wildly useful to other bryologists, but unread and uninteresting to the broader public.

Auras an essay on the meaning of colors

auras an essay on the meaning of colors

Richard Spruce, along with his favorite bryological specimens, occupied tenuous, almost dual identities in Victorian science. Both the botanist and his bryological colleagues struggled with how “popular” their work could aspire to be. Although he generally fits into the category of masculine, sensationalist Victorian explorer (along with Wallace and Bates), Spruce was far from the strong, resilient model of conqueror of nature; for most of his life, the naturalist was too sick to work, and spent his favorite days in the Amazon sitting quietly on the ground, examining the miniscule plants that reminded him of home. These miniscule plants, too, fit uneasily into broader botanical categories. While they represented something clandestine, sexual, and primeval in literature, bryophytes were considered relatively uninteresting and even unimportant in a rapidly expanding British botanical empire. Although he never fully transformed into a species of moss, Richard Spruce’s uncommon affinity with the plants relegated his work to the depths of the botanically obscure, wildly useful to other bryologists, but unread and uninteresting to the broader public.

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