Keyhole essay format

Currently at Milford Galleries Dunedin – PROVOCATIONS – 11th March-6th April.
“The works now hung and curated I first saw backstage at Milford Galleries Dunedin. Being mainly familiar with the muscly black-singletted bloke, the iconic if not archetypal Kiwi male, set within thick enclosing boundaries, my first impression was of the difference in scale. Not only are these paintings big, but the bounded edges were so dominant that they almost became the pictures, while tucked away in the middle, as if through a key-hole or in a little alcove, was a figurative figure. At first glance these multi-coloured mosaics caught my eye. As I moved closer some large words, rough painted, imposed themselves, as did the figure within the alcove or keyhole. Then the mosaic fragments themselves morphed into words strung like roughly hand-made beads, strings of them, encasing the figure in the middle. Occasionally I recognised a name, such as John A. Lee, Aunt Daisy, Nelson Mandela or Hone Heke. As I wandered around the big paintings, propped at various angles against any spare table or wall capable of coping with the load, I sometimes paused to peer at the strings of letters and words as if they would make sense if only I looked a little harder. As a rule they did not, reminding me of language before grammar, deep time; but also tempting me to provide a grammar that would give the seemingly random words some meaning. My mind trailed away – random, survey, controlled experiment, statistics, probability. And then suddenly, somewhere amid the verbiage, a sentence was there, rewarding the patient explorer. At other times, as in ‘A Full List for You to Remember’, even the tyranny of the alphabet appeared to be under challenge.” Click to read the full essay by author and Professor at the University of Otago’s Department of History, Erik Olssen.

The tragic character of Dr Blifil – unlucky in his career as a reluctant and unsuccessful doctor, and unfortunate in lacking any chance with Bridget - is introduced in chapter 10. And yet his tragedy is of his own making. What attracts him to Bridget is almost entirely her family name, and because of it he introduces his heartless brother to her. Human folly is again show to be one of Fielding's topics. He also makes a contemporary joke in relation to Bridget, by asserting that she was immortalized in a Hogarth drawing. This reference would have amused his reader, as Hogarth’s work was well known. This is another way in which the characters are made more universal than real.

Tentatively we could suggest that this shift might instead indicate a number of possible changes including (1) a shift in the routes of material flow, especially metals away from this region towards more westerly sources, and/or (2) a fundamental socio-technological transformation of the entire region, in which the aesthetic value and notions of identity are re-orientated away from metals (and flows of metal or metallic objects), towards the medium of textiles (and flows of cloth or patterns). Support for this idea may come from Mesopotamia, where it is said that true polychromatic textiles first appeared in the Near East gradually from the mid to late 3rd millennium (Barber 1991), and wool-gathering and textile production seem to have formed a major industry from at least the Ur III period (Potts 1997: 91-92).

The genie is out of the bottle. What we need instead is a new ethic of responsible parenthood. If we combine an updated social norm with greater reliance on the most effective forms of birth control, we can transform drifters into planners and improve children’s life prospects… The drifters need better educational and job opportunities, but unless we come to grips with what is happening to marriage and parenting, progress will be limited. For every child lifted out of poverty by a social program, another one is entering poverty as a result of the continued breakdown of the American family. If we could turn back the marriage clock to 1970, before the sharp rise in divorce and single parenthood began, the child poverty rate would be 20 percent lower than it is now ….

The idea of a smartphone app that turns my relationship into a PacMan game is hard for me to handle. To me, location-sharing apps like Find My Friends in romantic relationships amounts to embracing the Orwellian inevitability of smartphones. Yes, with GPS-enabled devices, we can see where anyone is at any given time. No, this innovation does not amount to progress in terms of how we interact with the people we love most. It actually seems rather destructive, since it discourages you from talking to your partner and potentially misleads you about their activity. Just because your smartphone can do this thing does not mean that your should use your smartphone for this purpose.

Keyhole essay format

keyhole essay format

The genie is out of the bottle. What we need instead is a new ethic of responsible parenthood. If we combine an updated social norm with greater reliance on the most effective forms of birth control, we can transform drifters into planners and improve children’s life prospects… The drifters need better educational and job opportunities, but unless we come to grips with what is happening to marriage and parenting, progress will be limited. For every child lifted out of poverty by a social program, another one is entering poverty as a result of the continued breakdown of the American family. If we could turn back the marriage clock to 1970, before the sharp rise in divorce and single parenthood began, the child poverty rate would be 20 percent lower than it is now ….

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